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The Good SamariDON

Bishop+Robert+McElroy+celebrates+the+liturgy+of+St.+Polycarp+with+the+help+of+CCHS+altar+server+Anna+Bourke+%E2%80%9818%2C+immersing+himself+into+the+community+as+one+of+school%27s+own+members.%0A
Bishop Robert McElroy celebrates the liturgy of St. Polycarp with the help of CCHS altar server Anna Bourke ‘18, immersing himself into the community as one of school's own members.

Bishop Robert McElroy celebrates the liturgy of St. Polycarp with the help of CCHS altar server Anna Bourke ‘18, immersing himself into the community as one of school's own members.

Carson Linxwiler

Carson Linxwiler

Bishop Robert McElroy celebrates the liturgy of St. Polycarp with the help of CCHS altar server Anna Bourke ‘18, immersing himself into the community as one of school's own members.

Maddy Bass, Spiritual Life Editor

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Using the parable of the Good Samaritan, San Diego Bishop Robert W. McElroy encouraged the Cathedral Catholic High School community to lead all people no matter their race, gender, or financial status toward holiness by exhibiting the same compassion, inclusivity, and charity as the story’s hero during his homily yesterday at the St. Polycarp Liturgy in the Claver Center.

The parable of the Good Samaritan isn’t saying to be nice to others, but to go out of our safe zone for others, If we’re truly going to be disciples, we have to take a risk to help people even if they’re outside our group.”

— Bishop McElroy

The story of the Good Samaritan tells the tale of a Jewish man, who was attacked and beaten alone on the road as a priest and levite walked right past him despite the man’s helpless condition. Then, a Samaritan man of a different race and community offered a lending hand, taking a risk on the road less traveled to build a bridge of friendship based on compassion with the Jewish man.

“The Samaritan’s heart was attuned to God’s heart itself,” Pope Francis said in a National Catholic newspaper titled The Wanderer“[His actions] teach us what it means to take care of the other, to commit oneself, taking all the necessary steps to ‘come close’ to the other, to the point of identifying oneself with him.”

The theme of living outside of one’s comfort zone mentioned in the Gospel of Luke sparked movement in the life of CCHS student Sarah Lackey ‘17, as mentioned in her faith witness talk she gave prior to the start of Mass, setting the tone of yesterday’s liturgical celebration.

“Millions of Christians practice their faith against all odds,” Lackey said. “While in fear of being killed or persecuted by their community, they choose God over everything.”

After the prayers of the faithful, the song “How Great Thou Art” filled the gym with the melodious voices of CCHS student Mikayla Kappes ‘17, CCHS college counselor Mr. Torrey Eason, CCHS admissions associate Ms. Kayla Balke, CCHS administrative assistant Ms. Mallory Sigmon, and CCHS performing arts teacher Ms. Katie Wilson.

The harmony brought CCHS teachers, counselors, students and faculty members from different races, talents, and subjects together, exemplifying the message Bishop McElroy conveyed in his homily.

“Through our talents, we were all brought together more than we typically would be able to,” Ms. Balke said. “Even though we’re all different by race, gender, and jobs, we have singing in common.”

As a singer and participant in the choir, CCHS student Luke Leidiger ‘17 finds his passion for singing as an opportunity to bring the entire Dons family together through the power of voices as seen in yesterday’s liturgy.

“This Mass showed how teachers can come together to sing for Jesus,” Leidiger said. “That’s what music in our world should be about: coming together as a family and as humans.

“All music is a way for us to connect. It’s a reminder of who we are and where we came from.”

Taking risks seems difficult at times, but Bishop McElroy reminded the CCHS community of the call God asks of all His people: compassion and discipleship.

“God gives us great tests of our discipleship,” Bishop McElroy said. “Maybe someone who is of ‘the other’ is in desperate need, and in that person is the love of Jesus Christ.”

See you next year, Bishop McElroy!

 

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